FreeBSD 7.0 manual page repository

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ipcrm - remove the specified message queues, semaphore sets, and shared

 

NAME

      ipcrm - remove the specified message queues, semaphore sets, and shared
      segments
 

SYNOPSIS

      ipcrm [-q msqid] [-m shmid] [-s semid] [-Q msgkey] [-M shmkey]
            [-S semkey] ...
 

DESCRIPTION

      The ipcrm utility removes the specified message queues, semaphores and
      shared memory segments.  These System V IPC objects can be specified by
      their creation ID or any associated key.
 
      The following options are used to specify which IPC objects will be
      removed.  Any number and combination of these options can be used:
 
      -q msqid
              Remove the message queue associated with the ID msqid from the
              system.
 
      -m shmid
              Mark the shared memory segment associated with ID shmid for
              removal.  This marked segment will be destroyed after the last
              detach.
 
      -s semid
              Remove the semaphore set associated with ID semid from the sys‐
              tem.
 
      -Q msgkey
              Remove the message queue associated with key msgkey from the sys‐
              tem.
 
      -M shmkey
              Mark the shared memory segment associated with key shmkey for
              removal.  This marked segment will be destroyed after the last
              detach.
 
      -S semkey
              Remove the semaphore set associated with key semkey from the sys‐
              tem.
 
      The identifiers and keys associated with these System V IPC objects can
      be determined by using ipcs(1).
      ipcs(1)
 

Sections

Based on BSD UNIX
FreeBSD is an advanced operating system for x86 compatible (including Pentium and Athlon), amd64 compatible (including Opteron, Athlon64, and EM64T), UltraSPARC, IA-64, PC-98 and ARM architectures. It is derived from BSD, the version of UNIX developed at the University of California, Berkeley. It is developed and maintained by a large team of individuals. Additional platforms are in various stages of development.